EconTalk
Russ Roberts

Podcast episode Lant Pritchett on Poverty, Growth, and Experiments

EconTalk Episode with Lant Pritchett
Hosted by Russ Roberts

cash%20chicken.jpg How should we think about growth and poverty? How important is the goal of reducing the proportion of the world's population living on less than a dollar a day? Does poverty persist because people lack skills or because they live in economic systems where skills are not rewarded? What is the role of experimental methods in understanding what reduces poverty? Author and economist Lant Pritchett of Harvard University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about these questions and more in a wide-ranging discussion of how best to help the world's poorest people.

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Podcast episode Cass Sunstein on #Republic

EconTalk Episode with Cass Sunstein
Hosted by Russ Roberts

#republic.gif Author and legal scholar Cass Sunstein of Harvard University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his latest book, #Republic. Sunstein argues that the internet has encouraged people to frequent informational echo chambers where their views are reinforced and rarely challenged. In addition, there is a loss of public space where people might have to encounter dissonant ideas or causes they might wish to champion. Sunstein considers this a threat to democracy and discusses a variety of ways the situation might improve.

Size:30:9 MB
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Blame the Millennials

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

complacent.jpg This week, EconTalk host Russ Roberts welcomed back economist, author, and blogger Tyler Cowen of George Mason University. The subject was Cowen's newest book, The Complacent Class: The Self-Defeating Quest for the American Dream. In it, Cowen argues that Americans have become less innovative, less geographically mobile, and more segregated due to a cultural shift toward complacency. And yes, he thinks Millennials are particularly afflicted with complacency.

Have Americans- especially Millennials- become addicted to a soma-like state of leisure? What's needed to get folks out of their parents' basements and designing beautiful new buildings and making movies great again? As always, we'd like to hear your thoughts on this week's conversation.

1. How does Cowen define "complacency" in his book, and how does he argue it's affecting the US economy? Why does Roberts suggest it may instead be an income effect, and why does Cowen think it's not?

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Podcast episode Tyler Cowen on The Complacent Class

EconTalk Episode with Tyler Cowen
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Complacent%20Class.jpg Author and economist Tyler Cowen of George Mason University talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about his book, The Complacent Class. Cowen argues that the United States has become complacent and the result is a loss of dynamism in the economy and in American life, generally. Cowen provides a rich mix of data, speculation, and creativity in support of his claims.

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mobile.jpg How can government be made more user-friendly and to work better for everybody? That's the question that seems to motivate Jennifer Pahlka, founder of Code for America and this week's EconTalk guest. As you might expect, there's some divergence in Pahlka's and Roberts's views as to what government ought to do, and I suspect the same holds true of you...So please let us know your thoughts on this week's episode. As always, we love to hear from you.

1. Code for America's website claims, "The two biggest levers for improving people's lives at scale are technology and government." To what extent do you believe this to be true?

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Podcast episode Jennifer Pahlka on Code for America

EconTalk Episode with Jennifer Pahlka
Hosted by Russ Roberts

code%20US.jpg Jennifer Pahlka, founder of Code for America, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the organization she started. Code for America works with private sector tech people to bring technology to the provision of government services. Pahlka discusses some of the success Code for America has had with improving government and the challenges of citizenship and technology in the 21st century.

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Georgia on my Mind

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

georgia T.jpg Like many of you, I love when EconTalk host Russ Roberts welcomes real-world entrepreneurs to the show, as he did this week with Elizabeth Suzann founder Elizabeth Pape. Their discussion included the start-up story of the company, a fascinating exegesis of the price of an Elizabeth Suzann garment, and the practice of shopping ethically.

I hope you were as taken with this episode as I was. (And yes, I ordered a Georgia Tee, and I'll report back! And I want to know how many other new customers were created by the "EconTalk spike!"). Share your thoughts with us using the prompts below, or create your own...No matter how you choose to continue the conversation, we love to hear from you!

1. To what extent can/ought Elizabeth Suzann be a model for the entire apparel industry?

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Podcast episode Elizabeth Pape on Manufacturing and Selling Women's Clothing and Elizabeth Suzann

EconTalk Episode with Elizabeth Pape
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Liz Elizabeth Pape, founder of the women's clothing company Elizabeth Suzann, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about starting and running her company--a manufacturer and seller of high-end women's clothing in Nashville, Tennessee. The conversation chronicles the ups and downs of her entrepreneurial story, the recent evolution of the women's clothing market, and the challenge of competition from lower quality, lower-priced products.

Size:34.8 MB
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Something's Rotten

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

big bank.jpg
"You don't have to know anything about tier 1 capital to know something's rotten..."

The ratio of the financial industry's profits to its percentage of the overall economy has increased dramatically in recent decades, and has been pointed to by many as a cause for concern. That theme holds in this weeks EconTalk episode, in which host Russ Roberts welcomes Rana Foroohar of the Financial Times to discuss her new book, Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business. While Foroohar and Roberts don't necessarily agree on the solution, both are adamant about the problems this trend poses.

As usual, we'd like to hear what you think. Share your thoughts with us on what should be done to better discipline financial markets, the relationship between Wall Street and Washington, or your own experiences in the industry or regulatory sphere. As always, we love to hear from you.

1. What does Foroohar mean when she says the financial sector has gone from "greasing the wheels of Main Street capitalism" to becoming "the game in and of itself?"

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Podcast episode Rana Foroohar on the Financial Sector and Makers and Takers

EconTalk Episode with Rana Foroohar
Hosted by Russ Roberts

makers%20and%20takers.jpg Journalist and author Rana Foroohar of the Financial Times talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her book, Makers and Takers. Foroohar argues that finance has become an increasingly powerful part of the U.S. economy and has handicapped the growth and effectiveness of manufacturing and the rest of the economy.

Size:29.3 MB
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