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Podcast episode Elizabeth Pape on Manufacturing and Selling Women's Clothing and Elizabeth Suzann

EconTalk Episode with Elizabeth Pape
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Liz Elizabeth Pape, founder of the women's clothing company Elizabeth Suzann, talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about starting and running her company--a manufacturer and seller of high-end women's clothing in Nashville, Tennessee. The conversation chronicles the ups and downs of her entrepreneurial story, the recent evolution of the women's clothing market, and the challenge of competition from lower quality, lower-priced products.

Size:34.8 MB
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Something's Rotten

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

big bank.jpg
"You don't have to know anything about tier 1 capital to know something's rotten..."

The ratio of the financial industry's profits to its percentage of the overall economy has increased dramatically in recent decades, and has been pointed to by many as a cause for concern. That theme holds in this weeks EconTalk episode, in which host Russ Roberts welcomes Rana Foroohar of the Financial Times to discuss her new book, Makers and Takers: The Rise of Finance and the Fall of American Business. While Foroohar and Roberts don't necessarily agree on the solution, both are adamant about the problems this trend poses.

As usual, we'd like to hear what you think. Share your thoughts with us on what should be done to better discipline financial markets, the relationship between Wall Street and Washington, or your own experiences in the industry or regulatory sphere. As always, we love to hear from you.

1. What does Foroohar mean when she says the financial sector has gone from "greasing the wheels of Main Street capitalism" to becoming "the game in and of itself?"

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Podcast episode Rana Foroohar on the Financial Sector and Makers and Takers

EconTalk Episode with Rana Foroohar
Hosted by Russ Roberts

makers%20and%20takers.jpg Journalist and author Rana Foroohar of the Financial Times talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her book, Makers and Takers. Foroohar argues that finance has become an increasingly powerful part of the U.S. economy and has handicapped the growth and effectiveness of manufacturing and the rest of the economy.

Size:29.3 MB
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Everyday Tragedies

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

A special thank you to Alice Temnick for creating this week's Extra.

giving homeless.jpg Do you drop coins in a cup or hand a dollars to homeless people? Does this help that person or perpetuate the "problem"? Does it make you feel better because you are doing something? Have you wondered, as Erica Sandberg and Russ Roberts do, if there is a better way to address this uncomfortable political and social issue?

Podcaster and writer Erica Sandberg talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about homelessness in San Francisco. Sandberg talks about what the city can do about homelessness and her experience with Downtown Streets Team, which gives homeless people in the Bay Area the chance to work in exchange for gift cards that let them buy food and other basics.

Share your thoughts with us about this model or any other private organizations you are aware of that are addressing issues of homelessness. We love to hear from you!

1. A common misconception or description of homelessness is the number of women and children "on the streets". But Sandberg argues that this is not what we are seeing, that the face of homelessness predominantly one of a single male often representing behaviors of substance abuse and/or mental illness. Is this consistent with your first hand observations or second hand information of the problem?

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Podcast episode Erica Sandberg on Homelessness and Downtown Streets Team

EconTalk Episode with Erica Sandberg
Hosted by Russ Roberts

homeless.jpg Podcaster and writer Erica Sandberg talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about homelessness in San Francisco. Sandberg talks about what the city can do about homelessness and her experience with Downtown Streets Team, which gives homeless people in the Bay Area the chance to work in exchange for gift cards that let them buy food and other basics.

Size:26.5 MB
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I, Taxpayer

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

read lips.jpg What are you glad your tax dollars pay for? What are you upset your tax dollars pay for? These are just some of the questions this week's EconTalk guest, Vanessa Willamson of the Brookings Institution, asked a group of American adults. What she found about the way Americans think about their taxes may surprise you...

So let's hear about it. Have you read Willamson's new book, Read My Lips: Why Americans Are Proud to Pay Taxes? If not, will this week's episode encourage you to do so? How did this week's conversation influence the way you feel about paying your own taxes? Share your thoughts with us today...As always, we love to hear from you.

1. The conversation begins with a discussion of some of the most common misconceptions Americans have about the taxes they pay. Which of these most surprised you, and why?

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Podcast episode Vanessa Williamson on Taxes and Read My Lips

EconTalk Episode with Vanessa Williamson
Hosted by Russ Roberts

Read%20My%20Lips.gif Are Americans overtaxed? How does the average American feel about the tax system and tax reform? Vanessa Williamson of the Brookings Institution talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about her book, Read My Lips. Williamson shares the results of her survey of American attitudes toward taxation and government spending. People misperceive much about who pays what and the structure of the tax system, particularly the payroll tax. But some of what appears to be errors--about foreign aid and government waste for example, come from the average person's definition of these terms being different from the narrow meaning.

Size:31.5 MB
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Midtown Mysteries

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

skyline.jpg
Why do we think of Manhattan as the land of skyscrapers? Have you ever really noticed the shape of the Midtown skyline? EconTalk host Russ Roberts has, and he's been perplexed. So this week he welcomed Jason Barr to the program to discuss his new book, Building the Skyline: The Birth and Growth of Manhattan's Skyscrapers. There are very few skyscrapers between City Hall and 34th Street, but it's probably not because of some of the reasons often cited.

Let us know your reaction to this week's episode. Share it with your students, your friends, your family, and let's keep the conversation going. As always, we love to hear from you.

1. What did "sprawl" look like in the early days of Manhattan? What was the (perhaps ironic?) role that public transportation played in this phenomenon?

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Podcast episode Jason Barr on Building the Skyline and the Economics of Skyscrapers

EconTalk Episode with Jason Barr
Hosted by Russ Roberts

fBuilding%20the%20Skyline.jpg Why does the Manhattan skyline look like it does with incredible skyscrapers south of City Hall then almost no tall buildings until midtown? Jason Barr of Rutgers University-Newark and author of Building the Skyline talks with EconTalk host Russ Roberts about the evolution of Manhattan as a place to live and work, and the mix of individual choices and government policy that created the skyline of Manhattan.

Size:35.6 MB
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"You no doubt wish to see the garden?"

EconTalk Extra
by Amy Willis

statistics.jpg EconTalk host Russ Roberts has made no secret of his skepticism about statistical analysis and econometric modeling. Yet in introducing this week's guest, Columbia University statistician Andrew Gelman, Roberts wonders aloud if he's gone too far. Does Gelman convince him to retract some of his skepticism?

As always, we'd like to continue the conversation with you. Use the prompts below in your classroom or at your next cocktail party... We'd love to hear the responses of you, your students, and your guests below!

1. Throughout the conversation, Gelman reiterates that relying on statistical significance in thinking about policy issues is problematic. What are the two major problems he sees with the use of statistical significance? How might these problems be mitigated, and how much statistical literacy does the public really need in order to think about issues such as early childhood interventions?

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